Borderline’s Hynes convicted

Bar and grill owner found guilty of grand theft



VERDICT—A jury has found Brian Hynes, right, guilty of grand theft. He is shown here with Borderline Bar and Grill co-owner Troy Hale on the one-year anniversary of the 2018 mass shooting at their establishment. Hale is not associated with the theft. Acorn file photo

VERDICT—A jury has found Brian Hynes, right, guilty of grand theft. He is shown here with Borderline Bar and Grill co-owner Troy Hale on the one-year anniversary of the 2018 mass shooting at their establishment. Hale is not associated with the theft. Acorn file photo

A Ventura County jury has found the owner of the Borderline Bar and Grill guilty of grand theft.

The Ventura County district attorney’s office successfully argued last week that Brian Hynes, 43, of Thousand Oaks, spent money meant for the OakHeart County Music Festival.

Hynes, a former member of the Rotary Club of Westlake Village, had since 2012 partnered annually with the organization to stage the annual charity music festival. In 2020, the festival was canceled due to COVID-19.

Hynes proceeded to misappropriate the refunded deposit for musical acts in the amount of $43,750, prosecutors said. Specifically, the almost $44,000 was given to Hynes by the Rotary to book country act Dustin Lynch as the headlining performer for OakHeart 2020. When the concert was canceled, Lynch’s promoter returned the money to Hynes.

Instead of returning the money to the Rotary, Hynes deposited the funds into a general business bank account that he controlled, and went on to spend the festival money on unrelated business and personal expenses, prosecutors said.

Since the 2018 Borderline mass shooting in which Hynes lost employees and friends, he has dealt with serious health issues. In 2021, he received a liver transplant, which was paid for in part by community donations.

“Facing difficult financial circumstances, Mr. Hynes decided to misappropriate venture money,” said Senior Deputy District Attorney Marc Leventhal, who prosecuted the case.

“Rather than mitigating his crime by taking responsibility, he instead put his former Rotary colleagues and business partner and employees through the ordeal of an emotionally draining trial,” Leventhal said. “I am grateful to the jury for the patience and dedication they showed in hearing the evidence and rendering their verdict.”

Hynes, who told the Acorn he could not comment on the matter to reporters, is scheduled to be sentenced at 9 a.m. Nov. 1 in Courtroom 48 of the Ventura County Superior Court. He is facing up to three years in jail and a maximum fine of $10,000.