2017-05-04 / Business

Nordic Nursery owner is ready for new adventures

Car wash to take place of long running business
By Becca Whitnall


LEAVING THE PLANT BIZ—Nordic Nursery’s owner Glenn Izard will retire after almost 40 years in business. The nursery will be replaced by a car wash on the 1-acre lot. “It’s been a good run,” Izard said, adding that he and his wife, Stephanie, are looking forward to retirement. 
RICHARD GILLARD/Acorn Newspapers LEAVING THE PLANT BIZ—Nordic Nursery’s owner Glenn Izard will retire after almost 40 years in business. The nursery will be replaced by a car wash on the 1-acre lot. “It’s been a good run,” Izard said, adding that he and his wife, Stephanie, are looking forward to retirement. RICHARD GILLARD/Acorn Newspapers Retirement usually means moving on to greener pastures, but for Glenn Izard, things have been pretty green all along.

Izard and his wife, Stephanie, are the owners of Newbury Park’s Nordic Nursery, which they opened in 1979.

“It’s been a good run,” Glenn Izard said, “but we’re pretty happy about our new adventures.”

Those will include spending time with their three granddaughters as well as hitting the road with the Southern California Dodge Viper Club. Izard is the club’s president.

Before retiring, the nursery owner is selling Nordic’s 1-acre site at 1312 Newbury Road. A drive-thru car wash, approved last week by the planning commission, will go in its place.


WHAT THE FUTURE HOLDS—A rendering shows the future Blue Wave Express Car Wash that will be built on the site of Nordic Nursery on Newbury Road. The planning commission approved the project last week. The deadline to appeal the decision is today. 
Rendering courtesy of City of Thousand Oaks WHAT THE FUTURE HOLDS—A rendering shows the future Blue Wave Express Car Wash that will be built on the site of Nordic Nursery on Newbury Road. The planning commission approved the project last week. The deadline to appeal the decision is today. Rendering courtesy of City of Thousand Oaks The planning commission voted unanimously April 24 in favor of the car wash, which was designed by local architect Neal Scribner. Ten residents spoke in support of the project while three were against it. The city also received 18 letters written in opposition.

Opponents mostly cited the number of car washes nearby— listing five others—and the effect construction would have on the property’s 17 protected oak trees. Though no on-site oaks will be removed, two nearby oaks will need to be transplanted and 20 will be encroached upon, putting them at risk for damage or death.

“I don’t mind a new business being built on existing industrial property, but to remove any oak trees is deplorable,” wrote Newbury Park resident Zizi Howell. “On the contrary, we need to protect all of the oak trees that remain in the city and ensure their well-being.”

To minimize the impact on trees, the developer will use porous pavement and concrete in protected zones and will avoid excavation in those areas, the applicant said during the meeting.

The Conejo Oak Tree Advocates gave the project its stamp of approval.

Design

The car wash will have two wash tracks accessed by a single driveway as well as 11 service spaces where customers can vacuum their vehicles after going through the wash. Hours of operation are approved as 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily.

This particular model car wash is new to the Conejo Valley, the applicant’s son told the commission. Noordin Yusufaly, the applicant himself, was unable to attend the meeting.

“There’s nothing like it in Agoura Hills, Westlake, Thousand Oaks or Newbury Park,” Ali Yusufaly said. “It’s an express exterior car wash . . . you stay in your car the entire time and the only time you would exit the vehicle is if you would like to vacuum your car.”

Comments about the number of car washes in the area fell on deaf ears, as planning commissioners are not allowed to take such factors into consideration when rendering a land-use decision.

“We aren’t allowed to step into the shoes of the property owner and judge what goes where,” Commissioner Drew Pletcher said.

“So long as it complies with our codes, our guidelines, our standards, that is our judgment point, our decision- making point,” he said.

Anyone interested in appealing the planning commission’s decision has until today, May 4, to do so. The cost is $1,500.

The Izards hope that doesn’t happen. They plan to close by July and want to spend that time preparing for their new lives and saying their goodbyes to longtime customers.

“I want to say thank you to all my loyal customers over the years,” Glenn Izard said. “We’ve enjoyed supporting the schools with plants for graduation and the Westlake Women’s Garden Club and CLU’s Scandinavian Days, but we’re looking forward to retiring.”

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